‘Essentially politically-minded’

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ABOVE: There was mutual admiration between Edward (“Ned”) Michael Hanlon (1887-1952) – the Queensland Home Secretary (17 June 1932 to 5 December 1935), State Health Minister (5 December 1935 to 27 April 1944) and State Premier and Chief Secretary (7 March 1946 to 15 January 1952) and State Member for Ithaca (from 8 May 1926 to 15 January 1952) – and the Rector of the Church of England Parish of Ithaca-cum-Bardon (from 4 October 1920 to 3 October 1939), the Reverend Canon David John Garland, OBE. This image, from page 7 of “The Telegraph” of 19 December 1936, speaks to the regard each man had for the other, and to their respective capacities for seeing need and finding innovative ways to meet it.

LATE CANON GARLAND.

Dr. Wand’s Tribute.

BRISBANE. October 10. Clergy of the Greek Orthodox Church added their prayers for the repose of the soul of the late Canon D J. Garland [ David John Garland ] at a Requiem celebrated by Archdeacon Thomas [ The Venerable Harry Thomas ] at St. Barnabas’ Church, Ithaca, to-day.
Delivering a panegyric, Archbishop Wand [ John William Charles Wand ] said that the service, which departed in certain respects from the usual one, was in accordance with the wishes of the late Canon Garland.
It was characteristic of him that he should wish to be amongst his own people at the last.
Dr. Wand told that before his arrival in Queensland, he had heard much of Canon Garland from immigration officers in London, who praised his zeal and energy for the Queensland New Settlers’ League.
Hundreds of men and women in Queensland were grateful for his assistance when they migrated.
Canon Garland believed that religion penetrated into every part of human life and every-day matters.
He was essentially politically-minded, and through his friendship with Ministers of State he must have had a strong influence on the good government of Queensland.
After referring to the late Canon’s persistent endeavours on behalf of soldiers, Dr. Wand traversed his work in the Church as Chairman of Committees at Synod, member of the Diocesan Council and member of the Board of Nomination.
First and foremost, however, he was parish priest, beloved of his people.
Largely through his efforts the Bible had been introduced into State schools.
“Essentially he was a fighter,” Dr. Wand added.
“He was not a man who found an easy path through life. To him the whole world was a great battleground – a struggle between right and wrong.
“To him there were no two sides to any question – only the right side.
“The late Canon stirred up enemies, but he had never known one who so desired the love and affection of people.”
Participation in the service of Rev. Nikon Patrinakos, Rev. A. Antonieff, and Monk F. Shaberin, of the Greek Orthodox Church, and Mr. Christie Freeleagus (Greek Consul), recalled that the Greek Patriarch honoured the late Canon Garland when, in the Great War, he permitted him to celebrate Communion in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, and created him Knight of the Holy Sepulchre.
A choir of clergy led the congregation in a choral service.
The Premier (Mr. Forgan Smith) [ William Forgan Smith ] and the Minister for Health and Home Affairs (Mr. Hanlon) [ Edward “Ned” Joseph Hanlon ] were among the pall-bearers at the funeral, which was attended by a large concourse of notable citizens.

– from page 6 of “The Queensland Times” (Ipswich) of 11 October 1939.